2017, May 11: Jupiter, Spica & Big Dipper

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Jupiter shines in the southeastern sky during the early evening hours near the star Spica.  Jupiter is about 10 degrees to the upper left of the star and the planet is over 20 times brighter.  The giant planet continues to retrograde for about another month.  (For details see the link at the bottom of this posting.)  Through binoculars, up to four of Jupiter’s largest moons might be visible.  The constellation Corvus is nearby.  It consists of four stars that make an irregular box.

Meanwhile the Big Dipper is nearly overhead during the early evening hours of May.  Its famous double star, Mizar and Alcor are visible.

For more information about the planets see:



Categories: Astronomy, Sky Watching

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2 replies

  1. 1weaver – generally speaking, here is where the news that i come across in science, philosophy, mythology, geo-politics and personal experience can blend to fuel our minds and imaginations. the world is a rapidly changing place with many of us feeling that we have one foot in the past, one foot in the present and no clue about our where our feet will be in the future. its my belief that we can find our path by knowing ourselves more clearly, more objectively. individuals are unique blendings of the cultural, familial, educational and aspirational themes they have experienced and perhaps it would be helpful to take stock. what makes you tick and what ticks you off? knowing why you find yourself where you are, knowing more clearly where you genuinely - and realistically - want to go can only begin to happen by taking a good look at You. i aim to take full advantage of the massive amounts of information 'out there' as a springboard for the study and progress of Self. please join in!

    cool! fingers crossed i will be able to see one of jupiter’s moons…

    • Jeffrey L. Hunt – Jeffrey L. Hunt is an educational technologist living in suburban Chicago. When he's not learning about and implementing technology in classes, he's running or looking at the stars.

      Let’s know what you see!

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