2020, November 20: Moon East of Jupiter, Saturn. Mars in East

Mars in Pisces, November 20, 2020
2020, November 20: Mars is in the east-southeast after sunset. It is 2.7° to the lower right of Epsilon Piscium (ε Psc) and 2.9° to the lower left of Delta Piscium (δ Psc).

November 20, 2020: After sunset, bright rusty Mars is in the east-southeast in front of the dim stars of Pisces. This evening the thick crescent moon is east of the Jupiter-Saturn pair.  Jupiter continues to close the gap to Saturn as a runup to their Great Conjunction on December 21, 2020.

by Jeffrey L. Hunt

Chicago, Illinois:  Sunrise, 6:47 a.m. CST; Sunset, 4:26 p.m. CST.  Check local sources for sunrise and sunset times for your location.

One hour after sunset, bright rusty Mars is over one-third of the way up in the sky in the east-southeast.  It is slowly moving eastward among the dim stars of Pisces.  Use a binocular to spot it 2.7° to the lower right of Epsilon Piscium (ε Psc on the chart) and 2.9° to the lower left of Delta Piscium (δ Psc).

Jupiter, Saturn, Moon, November 20, 2020
2020, November 20: Jupiter is nearly 22° up in the south-southwest, 3.2° to the lower right of Saturn. In the starfield, the Jovian Giant is 2.0° below 56 Sagittarii (56 Sgr), while Saturn is 2.9° to the left of the star. Jupiter is 3.5° to the upper left of 52 Sagittarii (52 Sgr). The moon (5.8d, 38%) is over 17° to the upper left of Saturn.

Jupiter – over 80° to the west of Mars – is low in the south-southwest.  Jupiter continues to close the gap to Saturn as a prelude to their Great Conjunction on December 21, 2020. Saturn is 3.2° to the upper left of Jupiter.

The moon – nearly 40% illuminated and in front of the stars of Capricornus – is over 20° to the upper left of Jupiter.  Notice that the moon’s brightness is casting shadows on the ground.

Use a binocular to note that Jupiter and Saturn are dancing past the star 56 Sagittarii (56 Sgr on the chart). Jupiter is 2.0° below the star while Saturn is 2.9° to the upper left it.  Jupiter is 3.5° to the upper left of 52 Sgr.

For more about Mars during November, see this article.

Detailed note: One hour after sunset, Mars – over 32° up in the east-southeast – is 2.7° to the lower right of ε Psc and 2.9° to the lower left of δ Psc. Jupiter – 81.4° of ecliptic longitude west of Mars – is nearly 22° up in the south-southwest, 3.2° to the lower right of Saturn.  In the starfield, the Jovian Giant is 2.0° below 56 Sgr, while Saturn is 2.9° to the left of the star.  Jupiter is 3.5° to the upper left of 52 Sgr.  The moon (5.8d, 38%) – over 17° to the upper left of Saturn – is nearly 27° up in the south.  In Capricornus, the lunar crescent is 9.6° to the lower right of Delta Capricorni (δ Cap, m = 2.8).

For more about the Great Conjunction, read our feature article. This is the closest Jupiter – Saturn conjunction since 1623.

Read more about the planets during November.

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