2021, April 24: Evening Star, Bright Mercury, Venus, Mars, Gibbous Moon

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April 24, 2021:  Brilliant Evening Star Venus and bright Mercury are entering the evening sky.  They are low in the west-northwest during evening twilight.  The bright moon is in the southeast in Virgo.  Mars moves into Gemini as it approaches the star cluster Messier 35.

Chart Caption – 2021, April 24: Venus and Mercury are visible during bright evening twilight, low in the west-northwest.

by Jeffrey L. Hunt

Chicago, Illinois:  Sunrise, 5:56 a.m. CDT; Sunset, 7:42 p.m. CDT.  Check local sources for sunrise and sunset times for your location.

Venus and Mercury are low in the west-northwest after sunset.  Find a clear, natural horizon.  Use a binocular to first locate brilliant Venus about 3° above the horizon.  Bright Mercury is 1.3° to the lower right of Venus.

Can you see them without the binocular’s assistance?

Speedy Mercury is slightly closer and to the upper right of Venus tomorrow evening.  Mercury quickly moves higher into the sky.  It can be seen in a darker sky during the next few weeks, although its brightness dims.

Read more about Venus in our summary document.

Chart Caption – 2021, April 24: During the evening the moon is near Porrima in Virgo. Arcturus is to the left of the moon, while Spica is to the lower left of the lunar orb.

The very bright moon, 94% illuminated, is in the southeast as the sky darkens.  One hour after sunset, the lunar orb is 4.1° above the star Porrima in Virgo. (In mythology, Porrima was a Roman goddess of prophecy and childbirth.)

On a wider scale, the moon is at about the same altitude as topaz Arcturus, “the bear-guard.”  The star is about 30° to the left of the moon.  Spica, “the ear of corn,” is less than 20° to the lower left of the gibbous moon.

Chart Caption – 2021, April 24: During the early evening, Mars is in Gemini, near the feet of the celestial Twins.

Mars is in the west among the stars of Gemini, 3.6° to the lower right of Propus, “the projecting foot” (η Gem on the chart).  Castor and Pollux mark the heads of the celestial Twins.

Mars is approaching the star cluster M35.  The concentration resembles the Pleiades star cluster, but it is nearly 10 times farther away.  From this distance our eyes see the stellar bunch as a cloudy blotch of light.

Chart Caption – 2021, April 24: Through a binocular, Mars approaches the star cluster Messier 35 (M35). Propus (η Gem) is in the field.

A binocular reveals the cluster’s brightest stars, although the moon’s brightness makes it difficult to locate the collection of stars without the binocular’s assistance.  The chart shows a binocular view of the cluster, Mars, and Propus.

Here’s more about Mars during 2021.

Read about Mars during April.

Detailed Note: During the early morning hours, the moon is near Nu Virginis (ν Vir, m = 4.0).  At about 2:30 a.m. CDT, the moon is 0.3° to the lower left of the star.  From southern Florida, across the Gulf Coast, Mexico, and Central America, and throughout the American West, the moon blocks the star.  See http://www.lunar-occultations.com/iota/bstar/0424zc1702.htm  for details for your location. One hour before sunrise, Jupiter is nearly 15° above the east-southeast horizon.  It is 4.0° to the upper left of Deneb Algiedi, 1.2° to the lower left of μ Cap, and 2.1° to the upper right of ι Aqr.  Saturn, not as bright as Jupiter, is 14.5° to the upper right of Jupiter.  The Ringed Wonder is 1.3° to the upper right of θ Cap.  Twenty minutes after sunset, Venus is slowly climbing into the evening sky.  It is less than 3° up in the west-northwest. Mercury (m = −1.7) is 1.3° to the lower right of Venus. One hour after sunset, Mars – in Gemini – is 1.6° to the right of 1 Gem and 3.6° to the lower right of Propus. With a bright sky from the moon, use a binocular to view the star cluster M35, 1.4° to the upper left of Mars.  The bright moon (13.0d, 94%) is less than 40° up in the southeast.  It is 4.1° above Porrima (γ Vir, m = 3.4).  Arcturus (α Boo, m = −0.1) has nearly the same altitude as the lunar orb.  The star is over 30° to the left of the star.  Spica (α Vir, m = 1.0) is nearly 19° to the lower left the moon.

Read more about the planets during April 2021.

2021, July 26: Evening Sky, Mars Closes In

July 26, 2021:  Four bright planets are in the evening sky.  Mars closes in on Regulus for their conjunction in three evenings.  Brilliant Evening Star Venus appears to the upper left of the impending Mars – Regulus conjunction.  Saturn and Jupiter are low in the southeastern sky after sunset.

2021, July 25: Evening Sky, Mars on Final Approach

July 25, 2021:  Four evenings before its conjunction with Regulus, find Mars in the western sky to the lower right of Venus.  As the calendar day ends, look for the moon below bright Jupiter.

2021, July 24: Four Evening Planets, Moon

July 24, 2021: After sunset, Venus and Mars are in the western sky.  A little later during evening hours, the moon is near Jupiter and Saturn in the southeast.

2021, July 29: Jupiter – Mars Opposition

July 29, 2021:  Jupiter and Mars are 180° apart along the ecliptic.  Dim Mars sets in the west-northwest as Jupiter rises in the east-southeast.  This event signals that soon both appear in the sky simultaneously.



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