2021, April 29: Evening Star Venus, Mercury, Mars in Gemini

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April 29, 2021: Evening Star Venus and bright Mercury are in the west-northwest during bright twilight.  As the sky darkens, Mars is at the feet of Gemini in the western sky.  Through a binocular the Red Planet is above the star cluster Messier 35.

Chart Caption – 2021, April 29: Vega rises at sunset. It is low in the northeast an hour later.

by Jeffrey L. Hunt

Chicago, Illinois:  Sunrise, 5:49 a.m. CDT; Sunset, 7:47 p.m. CDT.  Check local sources for sunrise and sunset times for your location.

Vega, “the falling eagle,” rises at sunset.  An hour later, the bright star is low in the northeast.  Find it higher in the northeastern sky later during the evening hours.

Vega is the third brightest star, after Sirius and Arcturus, visible from the mid-northern latitudes. Sirius is low in the west-southeast after sunset, while Arcturus is high in the eastern sky at this hour.

Chart Caption – 2021, April 29: Venus and Mercury are low in the west-northwest about 20 minutes after sunset.

Brilliant Venus is seemingly on a slow track into the evening sky.  Mercury is beginning its best appearance in the evening sky for the year.

Both are visible during bright twilight in the west-northwest.  Twenty minutes after sunset, brilliant Venus is over 4° above the horizon. An elevated spot makes it easier to find the planet.  Use a binocular to initially locate the bright world.  Mercury is 3.7° above Venus and within the field of view of the binocular.

Read more about Venus in our summary document.

Chart Caption – 2021, April 29: One hour after sunset, Mars is in the west at the feet of Gemini.

An hour after sunset, Mars is at the feet of Gemini, over 36° up in the western sky.  The Red Planet is 2.3° to the upper right of Propus, “the projecting foot,” (η Gem on the chart) and 2.7° to the right of Tejat Posterior, “the heel,” (μ Gem).

Mars continues its eastward march through Gemini.

Chart Caption – 2021, April 29: In a binocular, Mars is to the upper left of the star cluster Messier 35 (M35).

Mars is now past the star cluster Messier 35, but both are still within the same binocular field of view.  The planet is 1.8° to the upper left of the cluster.

Here’s more about Mars during 2021.

Read about Mars during April.

Detailed Note: One hour before sunrise, the moon (17.3d, 92%) is over 20° above the south-southwest horizon.  The lunar orb is 3.7° above Antares. Farther eastward, Saturn is over 20° above the southeast horizon.  It is 1.0° to the upper right of θ Cap.  Jupiter is 15.0° to the lower left of Saturn.  The Jovian Giant is 4.6° to the left of Deneb Algiedi, 2.0° to the lower left of μ Cap, and 1.6° to the upper right of ι Aqr. The gap between Jupiter and Saturn has not been this wide since late December 2019, when Jupiter was near its solar conjunction and Saturn was setting about 70 minutes after sunset. Vega (α Lyr, m = 0.0) rises at sunset. Twenty minutes after sunset, brilliant Venus is over 4° above the west-northwest horizon.  Mercury (m = −1.2) is 3.7° above Venus.  One hour after sunset, Mars is over 36° above the western horizon in front of the starry background of Gemini.  In the starfield, the Red Planet is 2.3° to the upper right of Propus and 2.7° to the right of Tejat Posterior.  Still in the view of a binocular, the star cluster M35 is 1.8° to the lower right of the planet.

Read more about the planets during April 2021.

2021, July 27: Four Evening Planets

July 27, 2021:  Evening Star Venus, Mars, Saturn and Jupiter are in the evening sky.  Mars is nearing its conjunction with Regulus in two evenings.

2021, July 26: Evening Sky, Mars Closes In

July 26, 2021:  Four bright planets are in the evening sky.  Mars closes in on Regulus for their conjunction in three evenings.  Brilliant Evening Star Venus appears to the upper left of the impending Mars – Regulus conjunction.  Saturn and Jupiter are low in the southeastern sky after sunset.

2021, July 25: Evening Sky, Mars on Final Approach

July 25, 2021:  Four evenings before its conjunction with Regulus, find Mars in the western sky to the lower right of Venus.  As the calendar day ends, look for the moon below bright Jupiter.

2021, July 24: Four Evening Planets, Moon

July 24, 2021: After sunset, Venus and Mars are in the western sky.  A little later during evening hours, the moon is near Jupiter and Saturn in the southeast.



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