2020: December 21: The Great Conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn


Jupiter, Saturn, and Mars, March 30, 2020
2020, March 30: Mars is 1.2° to the lower right of Saturn.

December 21, 2020: Jupiter passes Saturn in a close conjunction, a so-called a once-in-a-generation Great Conjunction.

March 2020 Planet Positions

Once a generation, Jupiter catches and passes Saturn. This is known as a Great Conjunction.  Both planets move slowly around the sun because of their distance from our central star.  A Jupiter year is nearly 12 Earth-years long while Saturn revolves around the sun in nearly 30 years.  A Jupiter-Saturn conjunction is rare enough for observers to take notice of this unique pairing.

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Click the gallery of Jupiter and Saturn images.

See our detailed article here.

Jupiter takes nearly 20 years to move past Saturn, travel around the sun, and catch Saturn again.  When Jupiter catches Saturn on December 21, 2020, they will be very close, only 0.1° apart!  This is the closest conjunction since the Great Conjunction of July 16, 1623!

December 2020

Look low in the southwest, one hour after sunset.  Bright Jupiter is easy to locate.  Dimmer Saturn is nearby, to Jupiter’s upper left.

On December 16, the crescent moon enters the scene. One hour after sunset, the crescent moon (2.3 days past its New phase, 7% illuminated) joins the planets. It is over 6° up in the southwest, about 5° below Jupiter. The Jupiter – Saturn gap is 0.5°.  This is about the apparent diameter of the moon.

Jupiter - Saturn 2020 Great Conjunction

Each night thereafter, Jupiter closes more on Saturn, until conjunction evening when they are 0.1°.  This is close enough to see them in through at a telescope’s low power. Here is the detailed note for conjunction evening:

  • December 21: Jupiter – Saturn Great Conjunction! One hour after sunset, Jupiter is about 12° up in the southwest, 0.1° to the lower left of Saturn. They are 30° east of the sun. Both fit into the eyepieces of modest telescopic powers. Jupiter’s Galilean Satellites are nicely lined up along the equatorial plane of the planet. Ganymede, Io, and Calisto are east of Jupiter, and Europa is west of the planet. Titan is nicely placed to the northwest of Saturn. After the conjunction, Jupiter moves eastward along the ecliptic, separating from Saturn. Each evening the planetary pair appears lower in the sky.

Angular Sizes

Moon image by NASA

When viewing the sky, the actual sizes of objects are difficult to determine because there is no depth perception.  We measure objects by their apparent angular size.  Apparent is how large they seem to our eyes.  Angular size is measured in degrees, like the way a protractor measures angles.  The moon appears to be about 1/2° in diameter.  At the Great Conjunction, Jupiter and Saturn are 0.1° apart.  This seems to be close, but they are easily distinguished from each other.  The image above shows the angular size of the moon and 0.1° of angular size on the moon.  The large circular feature is the largest lunar feature, the Imbrium Basin, easily visible without a binocular or telescope.  So the planets are close together, but they do not appear as a “single star” at the conjunction.

Detailed Motion of Jupiter and Saturn

The image at the top of this article shows a close conjunction of Venus and Jupiter.  Notice the separation of the two planets.  At the 2020 Great Conjunction, Jupiter and Saturn are closer than this August 27, 2016 conjunction.

2020: The apparent motions of Jupiter and Saturn compared to the background stars.

In 1961, the Jupiter – Saturn conjunction occurred in the morning sky, about 2° below 56 Sagittarii. (Note the star’s location on the accompanying chart, nearly 5° west of the Capricornus – Sagittarius border.) The 2020 conjunction occurs about 6° farther eastward, just east of the constellations’ border.

The chart above shows the motions of the planets against the background stars.  Two apparent motions occur to the Bright Outer Planets – Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn.  As Jupiter and Saturn emerge from their solar conjunctions, early in 2020, they appear higher in the sky when weekly observations are made.  They somewhat match the annual westward march of the stars.  This is caused by the earth’s revolution around the sun.  The stars are a calendar.  Over several human lifetimes, the same star is in the same position at the same time and same date each year.

The second motion is a combination of the planets’ slow orbit around the sun, especially for Jupiter and Saturn, since they don’t appear to move far during a year and Earth.  Jupiter and Saturn appear to move eastward (direct motion) compared to the starry background.  During the next year they are among a faint starfield in eastern Sagittarius and western Capricornus.  As our planet catches up and passes between them and the sun (opposition), they appear to move westward (retrograde motion) compared to the stars — retrograde motion.  After Earth passes them, Jupiter and Saturn seem to resume their direct motion compared to the background that moves farther west and rise earlier as the seasons progress.

Jupiter finally catches Saturn in late December for this Great Conjunction. On the chart, notice that Mars passes Jupiter and Saturn during late March 2020.

Read about the 1623 Jupiter – Saturn Great Conjunction here.

Monthly Summaries of What to Watch

(Bookmark this page to return for monthly updates of the planets’ locations.)

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